Basic Care: Grooming, Desensitizing Your Bird to Toweling, Nail and Wing Trims / Soins de base : Le toilettage et la désensibilisation à la contention, à la taille des griffes et des ailes

LKeeltyBy Lisa Keelty
Lire la traduction française  →

Toweling
Teaching your pet bird to allow itself to be “toweled” is important to help reduce the stress of restraint which occurs during vet visits and grooming. Follow the steps below to teach your bird to allow and even enjoy being held in a towel. Patience is the key, take each step carefully and slowly until your bird accepts the behaviour. Begin with food rewards and eventually replace them with attention. Keep training sessions to 5-10 minutes, short and sweet. Once your bird accepts a step fully, continue to the next stage.

Step 1: Either on a couch, table or bed, place a towel flat on the surface and play with your bird on it with toys and some food rewards.

Step 2: While playing on the towel, slowly fold corners and let your bird see this. Increase the areas being folded over sessions.

Step 3: Gently drape a small portion of the towel over the back of your bird. Increase the part of the towel covering the bird until he allows you to fully cover his back.

Step 4: With the towel over his back, place the palm of your hand on it and apply a small amount of pressure.

Step 5: With the towel over his back, gently take both your hands and pick your bird up slightly using enough pressure along the back and flanks of the bird to support it. Hold for 5 seconds, and reward. Increase time in future sessions.

Never put any pressure on the bird’s chest as this can result in the inability of the bird to breathe.

Grooming
There is not much grooming involved for most pet birds with the exception of weekly bathing and occasionally trimming nails and wings (which is debatable).

Bathing
Birds that come from humid tropical environments like macaws, amazons and some types of cockatoos can be bathed daily, but species from arid regions such as budgies and cockatiels should only be given one bath a week to help avoid encouraging breeding behaviour. Baths can be offered in a variety of ways; smaller birds may profit from a small plastic bath that can attach to a cage door. Larger birds might prefer being misted with a water bottle or even sprayed with a shower head. Bathing helps keep birds’ feathers clean and preened. For feather pluckers and moulting birds bathing can bring a sense of relief from itchy pin feathers. Never use soaps when bathing your pet bird, plain warm water is best. Avoid using enzymatic bird bath products as they can remove the water-proof coating on the feathers of your pet.

Nail Trimming
Trimming nails is a delicate process and is done for several reasons: to reduce the chance of nails becoming entangled in cage objects, to make sure that the bird’s owners can handle them without discomfort and to ensure that nails do not become overgrown and uncomfortable for the bird. Either speciality scissors or a dremel can be used to remove a portion of the nail, hopefully without hitting the vein. Always have a coagulant on hand if you do clip the quick by accident.

Nail trimmings need to be done as needed. How often can depend on many factors but on average it is about every two to four months. For passerines nail trimming can be a stressful experience so try to have proper perches in the cage to help minimize the frequency. Never use sandpaper perches, they do not work and cause more damage to the feet than any good.

Most medium and large parrots can be trained to accept nail trimmings without being restrained. If restraint is necessary do not attempt to clip anything without proper training. In some cases two people are needed, one to hold the bird and another to clip. Small birds can be held in one hand in a “bander’s grip” with the head between the fore and middle finger and the back of the bird against your palm. The other hand can manipulate the feet and toes and clip. This requires a certain degree of practice to be dextrous enough to multitask. Medium and large species of birds are best toweled. The same principle is used to restrain the bird except one person needs two hands to do the job. Use one hand to hold the neck (tightly, but not too tight) and the other supports the back of the bird or it can be pressed along the chest of the holder. Remember to never put any pressure on the bird’s chest as this can result in the inability of the bird to breathe. The second person works the feet and toes and clips.

Teaching your bird to accept nail trimming without restraint is not difficult, and can even be a game! Follow the steps below and remove the stress from nail trimming. Just as for toweling, patience is the key: take each step carefully and slowly until your bird accepts the behaviour; begin with food rewards and eventually replace them with attention; keep training sessions to 5-10 minutes; once your bird accepts a step fully, continue to the next stage.

Step 1: Gently play with your bird’s feet and reward him each time he accepts being touched.

Step 2: Take the nail scissors and play with them on the bird’s feet, gently tapping the toes. Let your bird touch and feel the scissors.

Step 3: Hold the toes out individually and place the tip of the trimmer at the tip of the nail.

Step 4: Gently clip the tip of one nail. Build trust and confidence slowly, do not attempt to clip all nails the first time.

Clippers can be substituted with a dremel if desired but use a high degree of caution when operating a rotary tool without restraining the animal. Always have a coagulant on hand in case you accidently clip the vein inside the nail.

Wing Trimming
Wing clipping is done to prevent escape, ease training and sometimes to reduce aggression. The choice on whether or not to clip wings is up to the individual owner however it is becoming more and more common to not clip wings. If wing clipping is a must, restraining the bird is similar to what is described above. Small birds can be done by one person, larger birds require two. When pulling the wing out always hold it at the elbow joint to secure it safely. Only the primary feathers should be clipped; the first 10 counting downwards but it is not often needed to clip all 10. Fledglings should never have more than 4 or 5 feathers clipped, and they should never be clipped too short. Adult birds can have up to 6-8 feathers trimmed but each individual bird will call for different lengths. Heavy bodied birds such as amazons and African greys should not have their primaries cut as short as a light bodied species such as most cockatoos.

Teaching your bird to accept wing trimming without restraint is not difficult, and can also be a game! Follow the steps below to remove the stress from wing trimming. Just as for toweling and nail trimming, remember that patience is the key: take each step carefully and slowly until your bird accepts the behaviour; begin with food rewards and eventually replace them with attention; keep training sessions to 5-10 minutes; once your bird accepts a step fully, continue to the next stage.

Step 1: Gently touch your bird’s wings and reward him each time he accepts being touched.

Step 2: Slowly open each wing, small amounts at first and then slightly more after each session until it can be almost fully extended.

Step 3: Hold the wing out, extended for 2 seconds, increase time in each future session until the bird lets you hold it for about 30-45 seconds.

Step 4: Gently clip 2 feathers from each wing. Build trust and confidence slowly, do not try and clip all feathers at once.

Never force the bird to have his wing opened more than he allows, a sudden jerk and rough handling can result in a fractured or broken wing.

Beak Trimming
Beak trimmings should never be done unless absolutely necessary, i.e., the animal is unable to eat or has a medical condition. Always have beaks trimmed by professionals. Trimming a break incorrectly can result in long-term growth deformations that can make a beak severely crooked.

Veterinarian Care
It is recommended to go for an annual check-up with your avian veterinarian once a year. It builds a relationship with your vet and a medical history for your pet. Vets can see problems that the average owner cannot, and catching any health issue early can have a huge impact on the survival rate for a bird, and may be financially cheaper than waiting until a medical condition becomes too serious.

Many bird owners avoid vet visits because they find seeking professional advice from a veterinarian is too expensive. In reality, a consultation with a certified avian veterinarian should not cost significantly more than an annual trip for a dog or cat.

Haut ↑

•    •    •

Traduction française par Danielle Veyre Piazzoli

Contention dans une serviette
Apprendre à votre oiseau à se laisser envelopper dans une serviette est important pour l’aider à réduire le stress qu’il ressent lorsqu’il est maintenu lors d’une visite chez le vétérinaire et pour effectuer des soins. Suivez les étapes décrites ci-dessous pour lui apprendre à se laisser maintenir dans une serviette, et même à l’apprécier. Le maître mot est la patience. Accomplissez chaque étape soigneusement et lentement, jusqu’à ce que votre oiseau l’accepte. Commencez avec des récompenses en nourriture, puis remplacez-les par de l’attention. Tenez-vous-en à des séances d’entraînement de 5 à 10 minutes, courtes et agréables. Une fois que votre oiseau accepte une étape complètement, passez à la suivante.

Étape 1 : Placez une serviette à plat sur la surface d’un canapé, d’une table ou d’un lit, et jouez dessus avec votre oiseau, en utilisant des jouets et des gâteries pour le récompenser.

Étape 2 : Pendant que vous jouez sur la serviette, pliez-en les coins lentement et laissez votre oiseau voir ce que vous faites. Augmentez les surfaces pliées au fur et à mesure des séances.

Étape 3 : Drapez délicatement une petite partie de la serviette sur le dos de votre oiseau. Augmentez la partie de la serviette recouvrant l’oiseau jusqu’à ce qu’il accepte que vous recouvriez complètement son dos.

Étape 4 : Avec la serviette sur son dos, placez la paume de votre main sur lui et exercez une petite pression.

Étape 5 : Avec la serviette sur son dos, prenez votre oiseau délicatement avec vos deux mains, en exerçant assez de pression sur le dos et les flancs pour le soutenir. Maintenez-le ainsi pendant 5 secondes, puis récompensez-le. Augmentez le temps au fur et à mesure des séances.

N’exercez jamais de pression sur la poitrine de votre oiseau, car cela peut l’empêcher de respirer.

Toilettage
La plupart des oiseaux de compagnie ne requièrent pas beaucoup de toilettage. Cela se résume à un bain une fois par semaine et, de temps en temps, la taille des griffes et des ailes (qui est discutable).

La baignade
Les oiseaux originaires d’environnements tropicaux, comme les aras, les amazones et quelques types de cacatoès, peuvent être baignés quotidiennement, mais les espèces originaires de régions arides, comme les perruches ondulées et les perruches calopsittes (« cockatiels »), ne doivent être baignées qu’une fois par semaine, pour éviter d’encourager les comportements reproducteurs. Les bains peuvent être offerts de diverses façons. Les petits oiseaux peuvent profiter d’une petite baignoire en plastique qui s’attache à la porte de la cage. Les grands oiseaux préféreront peut-être une petite douche, avec un flacon pulvérisateur ou même une pomme de douche. Le bain aide les oiseaux à garder leurs plumes propres et lisses. Pour ceux qui s’arrachent les plumes et pour les périodes de mues, c’est-à-dire lorsqu’il y a des sicots (bases des plumes) qui repoussent et créent des démangeaisons, le bain peut apporter une sensation de soulagement. N’utilisez jamais de savon lorsque vous baignez votre oiseau, mais simplement de l’eau tiède, c’est ce qu’il y a de mieux. Évitez les produits pour le bain enzymatiques destinés aux oiseaux car ils peuvent compromettre l’imperméabilité des plumes.

La taille des griffes
La taille des griffes est un processus délicat. On y procède pour plusieurs raisons : pour réduire le risque de se retrouver avec les griffes prises dans des objets à l’intérieur de la cage, pour que le propriétaire de l’oiseau puisse le manipuler sans inconfort et pour que les griffes ne deviennent pas trop longues, ce qui incommode l’oiseau. On peut utiliser des ciseaux spéciaux ou un dremel pour couper le bout de la griffe, en essayant d’éviter la veine. Il faut toujours avoir un coagulant sous la main, au cas où l’on provoque un saignement par accident.

La taille des griffes doit être effectuée selon les besoins. Sa fréquence peut dépendre de nombreux facteurs mais, en moyenne, elle est d’environ tous les deux à quatre mois. Pour les passereaux, la taille des griffes peut être stressante, et il faut donc essayer de leur offrir des perchoirs appropriés pour ne pas avoir à le faire trop souvent. N’utilisez jamais de perchoirs en papier sablé. Ils ne servent à rien et causent plus de dommages aux pattes que de bienfaits.

La plupart des perroquets de taille moyenne et de grande taille peuvent être entraînés à accepter la taille des griffes sans être immobilisés. S’il faut immobiliser l’oiseau, ne tentez rien sans la formation appropriée. Dans certains cas, deux personnes sont nécessaires, l’une pour tenir l’oiseau et l’autre pour couper les griffes. Les petits oiseaux peuvent être maintenus dans une main, avec la « prise du bagueur », c’est-à-dire la tête entre l’index et le majeur et le dos contre la paume. L’autre main peut manipuler les pattes et couper les griffes. Cela requiert un certain niveau de pratique, et il faut avoir la dextérité nécessaire pour accomplir plusieurs tâches à la fois. Pour les espèces d’oiseaux de taille moyenne et de grande taille, il est préférable d’utiliser la contention dans une serviette. Le même principe est appliqué pour immobiliser l’oiseau, mais une personne a besoin de ses deux mains, l’une pour tenir le cou (fermement, mais pas trop) de l’oiseau, et l’autre pour soutenir son dos. L’oiseau peut aussi être maintenu contre la poitrine de la personne qui le tient. Rappelez-vous de ne jamais enserrer la poitrine de l’oiseau, car cela peut l’empêcher de respirer. La deuxième personne s’occupe des pattes et coupe les griffes.

Apprendre à votre oiseau à accepter la taille des griffes sans l’immobiliser n’est pas difficile, et peut même devenir un jeu ! Suivez les étapes ci-dessous et éliminez le stress causé par la taille des griffes. Comme pour la contention, la patience est la clé : accomplissez chaque étape soigneusement et lentement, jusqu’à ce que votre oiseau l’accepte ; commencez avec des récompenses en nourriture, puis remplacez-les par de l’attention ; tenez-vous-en à des séances d’entraînement de 5 à 10 minutes ; une fois que votre oiseau accepte une étape complètement, passez à la suivante.

Étape 1 : Jouez doucement avec les pattes de votre oiseau et récompensez-le chaque fois qu’il accepte d’être touché.

Étape 2 : Prenez le coupe-ongle et jouez avec sur les pattes de votre oiseau, en lui tapotant doucement les doigts. Laissez-le toucher et tâter le coupe-ongle.

Étape 3 : Étendez chaque doigt de l’oiseau individuellement et placer le bout du coupe-ongle au bout de la griffe.

Étape 4 : Coupez doucement le bout d’une griffe. Établissez la confiance lentement. N’essayez pas de couper toutes les griffes la première fois.

Vous pouvez remplacer le coupe-ongle par un dremel si vous le souhaitez, mais soyez extrêmement prudent lorsque vous maniez un outil rotatif sans immobiliser l’animal. Ayez toujours un coagulant à portée de main, au cas où vous couperiez accidentellement la veine se trouvant dans la griffe.

La taille des ailes
La taille des ailes a pour but d’empêcher l’oiseau de s’échapper, de faciliter l’entraînement et, parfois, de réduire l’agressivité. Le choix de tailler les ailes ou non revient au propriétaire, mais il devient de plus en plus courant de ne pas les tailler. S’il faut absolument les tailler, la contention de l’oiseau se fait comme décrit ci-dessus. Les petits oiseaux peuvent être manipulés par une seule personne, les plus grands doivent l’être par deux personnes. Lorsqu’on ouvre l’aile, toujours la maintenir à l’articulation du coude pour l’immobiliser sans risque. Seules les plumes primaires doivent être coupées : les 10 premières en allant vers le bas, mais il n’est presque jamais nécessaire de couper les 10. Il ne faut jamais couper plus de 4 ou 5 plumes chez les oisillons, et jamais trop court. On peut tailler de 6 à 8 plumes chez les adultes, mais chaque individu nécessitera différentes longueurs. On ne doit pas couper les primaires des oiseaux lourds, comme les amazones et les gris d’Afrique, aussi courtes que celles d’espèces légères comme la plupart des cacatoès.

Apprendre à votre oiseau à accepter la taille des ailes sans l’immobiliser n’est pas difficile, et peut aussi devenir un jeu ! Suivez les étapes ci-dessous et éliminez le stress causé par la taille des ailes. Comme pour la contention et la taille des griffes, rappelez-vous que la patience est la clé : accomplissez chaque étape soigneusement et lentement, jusqu’à ce que votre oiseau l’accepte ; commencez avec des récompenses en nourriture, puis remplacez-les par de l’attention ; tenez-vous-en à des séances d’entraînement de 5 à 10 minutes ; une fois que votre oiseau accepte une étape complètement, passez à la suivante.

Étape 1 : Touchez doucement les ailes de votre oiseau et récompensez-le chaque fois qu’il accepte d’être touché.

Étape 2 : Ouvrez doucement chaque aile, un petit peu d’abord, puis un peu plus à chaque séance, jusqu’à ce vous puissiez l’ouvrir presque complètement.

Étape 3 : Maintenez l’aile ouverte pendant 2 secondes, puis augmentez la durée à chaque séance, jusqu’à ce que l’oiseau vous laisse la maintenir ainsi pendant environ 30-45 secondes.

Étape 4 : Taillez doucement 2 plumes de chaque aile. Instaurez la confiance lentement. N’essayez pas de tailler toutes les plumes d’un seul coup.

Ne forcez jamais l’oiseau à ouvrir son aile plus qu’il ne le supporte. Un geste brusque et une manipulation brutale peuvent résulter en une aile fracturée ou brisée.

La taille du bec
Il ne faut jamais tailler le bec, sauf absolue nécessité, c’est-à-dire si l’animal ne peut pas manger ou s’il souffre d’une maladie.

La taille du bec doit toujours être effectuée par un professionnel car, si cela n’est pas fait correctement, il peut se créer une déformation de la croissance à long terme, et le bec peut pousser tout de travers.

Soins vétérinaires
Il est recommandé d’amener votre oiseau chez un vétérinaire aviaire régulièrement chaque année. Cela permet de construire un lien avec votre vétérinaire, et un dossier médical pour votre oiseau. Les vétérinaires peuvent voir des problèmes que les propriétaires ne voient généralement pas, et déceler un problème médical tôt peut avoir un impact énorme sur le taux de survie d’un oiseau et revenir moins cher que si on attend jusqu’à ce qu’une maladie devienne trop grave.

Beaucoup de propriétaires d’oiseaux évitent les visites chez le vétérinaire parce qu’ils trouvent qu’aller chercher un avis professionnel revient trop cher. En fait, une consultation chez un vétérinaire aviaire certifié ne devrait pas être beaucoup plus coûteuse qu’une visite annuelle pour un chien ou un chat.

Haut ↑

Laisser un commentaire